Growing Doubt: a Scientist’s Experience of GMOs

Jonathan-LathamJonathan R. Latham, PhD By training, I am a plant biologist. In the early 1990s I was busy making genetically modified plants (often called GMOs for

Source: Growing Doubt: a Scientist’s Experience of GMOs

Effecting Change in our Dangerous Food Supply

headshot LB

I had an absolutely serendipitous experience a couple of weeks ago. I sat next to a man on a short Southwest Airlines flight who turned out to be a PR, lobbyist guy for biotechnology, factory farming and Monsanto. I apologize if you were sitting within six rows of us.

I was schlepping my carry-on bag down the aisle when a man in the aisle seat invited me to have the window seat. He said he was trying to save the middle seat for his co-worker. He joked that I was smelly and ugly and no one would want to sit next to me (at least I hope he was joking).

He jumped up and hoisted my very heavy, bursting at the seams bag into the overhead compartment.

It wasn’t a minute before his young colleague joined us. They chatted very excitedly about something. I snooped and saw they were emailing a press release to the New York Times.

I normally don’t make small talk with seat mates until the end of a flight in case they are overly talkative. The man started chatting with me and I gave the obligatory short, sweet answers and put my book in my face after each answer. But he kept on. I was a little intrigued since I saw them emailing the New York Times. He asked what I did for a living, I told him about my real job in advertising. I asked what he did. Continue reading “Effecting Change in our Dangerous Food Supply”

The Fight to Know What is in Our Food

 

 

dylieThis is a pivotal moment in the fight to know what is in our food. The integrity of organic food and labeling issues are very much in flux right now.

As it stands about 90% of all corn, soy, cotton, canola, sugar beets grown in the U.S. contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or are considered genetically engineered (GE). About 50% of zucchini, yellow squash and Hawaiian papaya are GE.

What does that mean? According to the Institute of Responsible Technology, “A GMO (genetically modified organism) is the result of a laboratory process where genes from the DNA of one species are extracted and artificially forced into the genes of an unrelated plant or animal. The foreign genes may come from bacteria, viruses, insects, animals or even humans. Because this involves the transfer of genes, GMOs are also known as “transgenic” organisms.”

Why does this matter to you? 85- 90% of all processed foods contain one or more GMO ingredient. GMOs were introduced to the market in the mid 90’s without any long-term testing. That’s right. You’ve been the guinea pig for about twenty years.

Perhaps over the last twenty years you’ve noticed a rise in some disease states such as cancer (specifically kidney, breast, colon and anal), diabetes, allergies, gastro-intestinal disorders, infertility, autism, auto-immune disease, ADHD etc. I’m not saying the two are linked, but I would say that there needs to be long-term studies on the effects of GMOs. Continue reading “The Fight to Know What is in Our Food”

The Good, the Bad and the Imposter Organic Brands

protest“No thanks, we’d rather not know what’s in that box of food stuff,” said the people of Washington state and California.

Not really, they were just bamboozled by brilliant and brilliantly deceptive ad campaigns costing $70 million dollars.

Last year Proposition 37 in California and just this month Ballot Initiative 522 in Washington State asked voters if they wanted mandatory labeling for foods containing GMOs in the respective states. Both states failed to pass labeling laws at about the same margin, 48% yes to 52% no. Continue reading “The Good, the Bad and the Imposter Organic Brands”

Just in Time for Fall Pumpkin Squash Soup

pumpkin squash soupI think it dropped below 70 degrees here in Austin, TX yesterday so I made this. You can make it vegan or vegetarian or even use chicken broth instead of vegetable broth. I made mine vegan and it was creamy and delicious.

2 Tbs. Butter or Earth Balance (for vegan recipe)
1 chopped organic onion
1 organic Granny Smith Apple (medium to large)
1 box or can of organic pumpkin puree (not pie filling)
1 small butternut squash
Vegetable broth (about 3 cups)
Salt and pepper
Dash of nutmeg
Can be topped with crème fraiche

Cook the squash until a little tender but not mushy (375 degrees for 15-20 minutes).
In the meantime, sauté the onion and chopped green apple in the butter or earth balance for about five to seven minutes.

When the squash is finished cooking remove the seeds and discard, then scrape out the guts and put it in a pot with onion and apple. Add the pumpkin, vegetable broth, dash of nutmeg and salt and pepper. Heat but don’t boil, reduce to simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour.

Either puree in a blender, food processor or my preferred method, emulsion blender.

Former Pro-GMO Scientist speaks out against GMOs

Well this should get your attention. Credit to Dylan Charles at Waking Times.

Former Pro-GMO Scientist Speaks Out On The Real Dangers of Genetically Engineered Food