Plant-based Diet: What I Eat in a Day

SOB burgerWhen I tell people I am a vegan, or that I eat a whole-foods, plant-based diet, they always say to me, “What do you eat?”

I think they picture me chasing a lettuce leaf around my plate. Not so. They are surprised when I cook for them or I show up to a party with my own delicious looking/tasting meal. If you are willing, try one meal. Maybe that will turn into two or more.

A note about these meals; in addition to eating completely plant-based, I also eat a very low fat diet. I do not eat oil, avocados or nuts. I occasionally have some seeds. A plant-based, low-fat diet has been proven to ward off cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Anyone can benefit from this lifestyle. I follow Dr. Esselstyn’s Prevent and PRHD cookbookReverse Heart Disease (PRHD) plan.

I have frequently asked questions about supplements, protein etc. at the end of the menu planning.

What I eat in a day:

I am giving three examples from super easy-no time for preparation, medium preparation and full-out cooking. Obviously, these menus work best mixed and matched so you aren’t in the kitchen all day one day and not much the next.

Day 1 – Easy, little to no preparation (Think of these examples as entry level, transitional meals)

Breakfast:

Disclaimer, you are not supposed to have coffee on the PRHD plan, but this is where I draw the line. It is one of my favorite things in the world and I refuse to give it up! I have a cup of organic coffee with a little bit of Pacific brand oat milk. Remember, no nut or coconut milks, they are high in fat.oat-milk

Cereal combo of Eziekiel, raw organic rolled oats, and organic puffed kamut (you can use any cereal and it doesn’t have to be a combo, I just like this) with berries, ground flaxmeal, cinnamon and oat milk.

Tip: I keep frozen berries in my freezer and run them under hot water to defrost when berries are out of season. Continue reading “Plant-based Diet: What I Eat in a Day”

The Consequences of Eating Plants Sprayed with Roundup

You don’t have to be a genius to figure out that something has gone horribly wrong in the last twenty years with our health and obesity levels. Stephanie Seneff, PhD, a Senior Research Scientist at MIT, may have the missing link; glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monasanto’s Roundup Herbicide.

Dr. Seneff links glyphosate with “autism … gastrointestinal issues such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, colitis and Crohn’s disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS, among others.” Continue reading “The Consequences of Eating Plants Sprayed with Roundup”